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Apartment complexes in the Boston suburbs

Went apartment hunting in expensive Boston.

Windsor Village at Waltham [web]. 10min drive from Alewife station on the red line. They have awesome two storied units, like little town houses with patios, on a hilly country side. Very pretty in the snow. About $1900/month without utilities. They have a week day shuttle from the complex to Alewife. Commuting to Boston is a hassle because of the two step process.

Avalon at Lexington Hills [web]. 15 min drive from Alewife station on the red line. They have very nice huge (1300 sq ft) two bedrooms costing about $2200/month without utilities. They have a week day shuttle from the complex to Alewife. Commuting to Boston is a hassle because of the two step process. They need you to have a cheap renters insurance, they have covered parking.

Overlook ridge, revere [web]. Reasonable units, some with a view of the old quarry. We saw a sunny 2 bedrrom. They have a pool room and a yoga room. They have a shuttle to Malden ctr T, and a shuttle to downtown, parking is included. Rent was about $1800. Again, the commute is a hassle, but not as much as the previous two.

An apartment complex near meadow glen mall, Malden, MA. Cheapish ($1600 for a 2 bed) not close to the T. A little shabby looking, reminded me of student accommodations.

Gateway apartment homes [web]. Right next to the Malden T, nice, a little hotel looking. Close enough to the T to hear it from your living room - may be not so nice. OK prices ($1895 - heat and hot water- + $80 parking), OK units, very convenient to transportation.

Wellington Place [web]. Right next to Wellington T. Very nice complex, but the neighborhood is shabby. $1800 for 2 bed, $120 for parking.

Oakgrovevillage [web]. Right next to Oak Grove T. Nice complex, close to Middlesex fells reservation. Pretty. Pricey ($1800 for a 1 bed, covered parking included, utilities extra)

Comments

  1. vThis helped a lot. Thank you

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  2. I wouldn't suggest Windsor Village to anyone. I currently live there and we are not happy. Ants are a major problem and the walls are paper thin. I can hear my neighbors as if I am in their apartment. The management sucks and the draw you in with a low price and then suddenly that apartment is no longer available and you are spending $1400 or more for a one bedroom. Our apartment had stained carpets when we moved in and lots of dings on the walls. They said they would ocme paint and clean the carpets but hey never did. Needless to say we are moving out after only 1 year. They are good about plowing and maintaining the property. Parking is a pain in the neck if you come home after 9:00 pm on any evening.

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