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TV converter box

Looked at consumer reports and decided to get the Insignia NS-DXA1 which is the same as the Zenith DTT900. Some reports say that there is an audio problem, and some guys actually did an fft of the signal output and showed that there are mysterious peaks at 12kHz and 16kHz. I'll be able to tell later tonight if this is gonna be a problem. Isn't it convenient that this simple piece of electronics is prices around $60? Which comes to $20 after our pooled tax money supplies $40? I think the guys at the company decided that people would be willing to pay $20 for this thing, and hence the price.

UPDATE: One trick for the sound apparently to bump up your TV volume all the way and use the Insignia to control the volume. [here] See my experience below

UPDATE: The box works well
  1. I got 22 channels. This depends on antenna positioning. With another position I got 19
  2. The signal is really really clear. We used to get grain all the time with analog
  3. Sound doesn't have a hiss problem. I boost the converter volume to 100% and adjust the TV volume.
  4. The hiss problem goes away when audio is set to Mono.

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