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IR Remote for Nikon

I didn't buy this for my Film SLR because I cost too much. Currently Nikon's brand (ML-L3) costs $15 on Amazon/Adorama etc. and on Nikon Mall costs $20. However, if you look here (bestofferbuy) you can get an 'alternate version', called the YN ML-L3, for $4.80 and free shipping. I was a little wary at first and wondered if this was a scam, but I decided to try it out and ordered two (aha, see how this works, they price it less and that gets the sucker customer to buy more). I guessed it would take a long time to get here, but it took about a week and a half. I tried out the first one and it works fine. The unit comes with battery installed but with a plastic tab to keep it from discharging. These shady Chinese operators are moving upscale. (Actually it ships from Hong Kong. Don't know if that's any different anymore).

I have plans for the other one. An intervalometer costs an insane amount of money. Say like $140. What I want to do is order a 555 and some pots from Digikey and modify the second remote for time lapse photography. Who knows, I may even get fancy and use a crystal and a binary decade counter with BCD encoding for accurate timing...

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