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50mm f/1.8 AF-D

I'm talking about this lens.
Its made in China, it costs about $130 now, bumped up from about $100 a year back. The focusing ring is dampened and easy to grip (Its a MF on the D40). The mount is metal, but not machined accurately - mine is a tight fit on the camera (and others have commented on this).
The image quality is excellent. This is a set of images of a deck of playing cards shot at the nearest range and at different apertures. The images are 100% crops from center (left) to edge (right). The DOF at f/1.8 is really shallow. The cards look washed out at f/1.8, but if you look at the red diamond and the edge of the middle card, they are sharp, indicating that the DOF is shallow enough (.1" or less) that the card goes out of focus by the time you go from center to edge. At f/2.5 the sharpness and contrast are remarkable:
f/2.5

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