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Flowing text in inkscape (Poster making)

You can flow text into arbitrary shapes in inkscape. (From a hint here).

You simply create a text box, type your text into it, create a frame with some drawing tool, select both the text box and the frame (click and shift) and then go to text->flow into frame.

UPDATE:

The omnipresent anonymous asked:
Trying to enter sentence so that text forms the number three...any ideas?

The solution:
  • Type '3' using the text tool
  • Convert to path using object->path
  • Size as necessary
  • Remove fill
  • Ungroup
  • Type in actual text in new text box
  • Select the text and the '3' path
  • Flow the text

    Comments

    1. Trying to enter sentence so that text forms the number three...any ideas?

      ReplyDelete
    2. * Type '3' using the text tool
      * Convert to path using object->path
      * Size as necessary
      * Remove fill
      * Ungroup <--- important
      * Type in actual text in new text box
      * Select the text and the '3' path (the path)
      * Flow the text

      (Post updated with this info)

      ReplyDelete
    3. I want to flow text in a frame AROUND the path combined within the frame. I am getting close but the feature seems unfinished. Lots more info needed .

      ReplyDelete

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