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Svn revision numbers

From here:

"Subversion's revision numbers apply to entire trees, not individual files. Each revision number selects an entire tree, a particular state of the repository after some committed change. Another way to think about it is that revision N represents the state of the repository filesystem after the Nth commit. When a Subversion user talks about “revision 5 of foo.c”, they really mean “foo.c as it appears in revision 5.” Notice that in general, revisions N and M of a file do not necessarily differ!"

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