Skip to main content

A simple exchange on eBay

I bought a 52mm-52mm coupler from a HK supplier (goes by the name of william-s-home). After I paid for the item, I noticed that the seller had a warning that the shipping could take 20-30 days and to email them if I wanted to cancel because I was just reading this note.

I emailed him and requested a cancellation. The seller was SO polite. We had a few exchanges and he/she was always extremely respectful.

I now have this image in my head of a venerable old Chinese trader who takes his business and reputation very seriously. For him, this is not just a way to earn money. It is a way of life, a principle, and things must be done correctly. The item cost $4.00 with shipping. It probably cost more than that for both of us in terms of the time spent emailing and completing the formalities for cancelling the transaction.

It was all very civilized and suddenly made me want to be a global trader, exchanging emails with people from far flung places in the globe, because life is too short and the world is too big and there are too many good people out there to not get to know them.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Flowing text in inkscape (Poster making)

You can flow text into arbitrary shapes in inkscape. (From a hint here).

You simply create a text box, type your text into it, create a frame with some drawing tool, select both the text box and the frame (click and shift) and then go to text->flow into frame.

UPDATE:

The omnipresent anonymous asked:
Trying to enter sentence so that text forms the number three...any ideas?
The solution:
Type '3' using the text toolConvert to path using object->pathSize as necessaryRemove fillUngroupType in actual text in new text boxSelect the text and the '3' pathFlow the text

Python: Multiprocessing: passing multiple arguments to a function

Write a wrapper function to unpack the arguments before calling the real function. Lambda won't work, for some strange un-Pythonic reason.


import multiprocessing as mp def myfun(a,b): print a + b def mf_wrap(args): return myfun(*args) p = mp.Pool(4) fl = [(a,b) for a in range(3) for b in range(2)] #mf_wrap = lambda args: myfun(*args) -> this sucker, though more pythonic and compact, won't work p.map(mf_wrap, fl)

Drawing circles using matplotlib

Use the pylab.Circle command

import pylab #Imports matplotlib and a host of other useful modules cir1 = pylab.Circle((0,0), radius=0.75, fc='y') #Creates a patch that looks like a circle (fc= face color) cir2 = pylab.Circle((.5,.5), radius=0.25, alpha =.2, fc='b') #Repeat (alpha=.2 means make it very translucent) ax = pylab.axes(aspect=1) #Creates empty axes (aspect=1 means scale things so that circles look like circles) ax.add_patch(cir1) #Grab the current axes, add the patch to it ax.add_patch(cir2) #Repeat pylab.show()