Skip to main content

Those geneticists and their Excel

Mistaken Identifiers: Gene name errors can be introduced inadvertently when using Excel in bioinformatics

If you are too lazy to get to the punchline:

"MatchMiner [1] and GoMiner [2] are two bioinformatics program packages we
published recently in another Biomed Central Journal, Genome Biology. When we
were beta-testing those programs on microarray data, a frustrating problem
occurred repeatedly: Some gene names kept bouncing back as "unknown." A little
detective work revealed the reason: Use of one of the research community's most
valuable and extensively applied tools for manipulation of genomic data can
introduce erroneous names. A default date conversion feature in Excel (Microsoft
Corp., Redmond, WA) was altering gene names that it considered to look like
dates. For example, the tumor suppressor DEC1 [Deleted in Esophageal Cancer 1]
[3] was being converted to '1-DEC.' Figure 1 lists 30 gene names that suffer an
analogous fate."

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Flowing text in inkscape (Poster making)

You can flow text into arbitrary shapes in inkscape. (From a hint here).

You simply create a text box, type your text into it, create a frame with some drawing tool, select both the text box and the frame (click and shift) and then go to text->flow into frame.

UPDATE:

The omnipresent anonymous asked:
Trying to enter sentence so that text forms the number three...any ideas?
The solution:
Type '3' using the text toolConvert to path using object->pathSize as necessaryRemove fillUngroupType in actual text in new text boxSelect the text and the '3' pathFlow the text

Pandas panel = collection of tables/data frames aligned by index and column

Pandas panel provides a nice way to collect related data frames together while maintaining correspondence between the index and column values:


import pandas as pd, pylab #Full dimensions of a slice of our panel index = ['1','2','3','4'] #major_index columns = ['a','b','c'] #minor_index df = pd.DataFrame(pylab.randn(4,3),columns=columns,index=index) #A full slice of the panel df2 = pd.DataFrame(pylab.randn(3,2),columns=['a','c'],index=['1','3','4']) #A partial slice df3 = pd.DataFrame(pylab.randn(2,2),columns=['a','b'],index=['2','4']) #Another partial slice df4 = pd.DataFrame(pylab.randn(2,2),columns=['d','e'],index=['5','6']) #Partial slice with a new column and index pn = pd.Panel({'A': df}) pn['B'] = df2 pn['C'] = df3 pn['D'] = df4 for key in pn.items: print pn[key] -> output …

Python: Multiprocessing: passing multiple arguments to a function

Write a wrapper function to unpack the arguments before calling the real function. Lambda won't work, for some strange un-Pythonic reason.


import multiprocessing as mp def myfun(a,b): print a + b def mf_wrap(args): return myfun(*args) p = mp.Pool(4) fl = [(a,b) for a in range(3) for b in range(2)] #mf_wrap = lambda args: myfun(*args) -> this sucker, though more pythonic and compact, won't work p.map(mf_wrap, fl)